Let’s Put the Heart Back Into Valentine’s Day

Happy Valentine’s Day!  ?

Valentine’s Day is a lovely little holiday that’s been around since the Middle Ages or before and is celebrated in almost every country on the planet. (Don’t we all love love?)

According to Wikipedia, it is a day to celebrate romance and romantic love. It has come to mean celebration of our love for children and others as well.  Wikipedia goes on to explain:

The day first became associated with romantic love within the circle of Geoffrey Chaucer in the 14th century, when the tradition of courtly love flourished. In 18th-century England, it grew into an occasion in which couples expressed their love for each other by presenting flowers, offering confectionery, and sending greeting cards (known as “valentines”). Valentine’s Day symbols that are used today include the heart-shaped outline, doves, and the figure of the winged Cupid. Since the 19th century, handwritten valentines have given way to mass-produced greeting cards.[9] In Europe, Saint Valentine’s Keys are given to lovers “as a romantic symbol and an invitation to unlock the giver’s heart…

It’s a day to celebrate love. But, in my opinion, it’s another holiday run amuck. A day designed to express love has turned in to another commercial frenzy.

Valentine’s Day “Stuff”

The stores, even the grocery stores, are full of cards, candy, and flowers to give to your child, your spouse, your lover, your friend and—and who Idioms of the Heartelse? Casual acquaintances? Mother-in-law (yep, there’s a card for her there), the boss? The meter reader? Your auto mechanic?

The children are expected to come to school with valentines of equal size and value for each child in the class whether they really know them or not so there is nothing even about friendship there. There is probably even a Valentine for your dog and probably some heart dog treats for a very high price.

The ads in the paper and TV commercials are featuring expensive jewelry, especially diamonds, as they try to guilt you into buying them. The lingerie ads and commercials show scantily clad women in a bright red, see-through, baby dolls or pieces of sleepwear that can’t be shown on a model because there isn’t enough fabric in them to keep a flea warm (or cover it, either).

On one TV program, I saw a young man holding a thong made out of a red cord and a tiny patch of lacy fabric. His comment was, “I can’t even fold this up because there’s nothing to fold.” Is this what Valentine’s Day is about?

Tenderness or Stuff? or Both?

Do we really equate love with stuff? Would we rather have tenderness or things?

Would we rather have someone who cherishes us and shows us that we are deeply loved or someone who feels pushed into buying something you don’t want and he probably can’t afford?

I’m not saying in any way that you can’t have both—the gift and the tenderness. But if you really love someone, what do you require? Most will take the tenderness. Do you agree?

My sentiments are expressed so very well in the Beatles song Can’t Buy Me Love. (You gotta love those very young Beatles). The video and lyrics are below:

 

 

I’ll buy you a diamond ring my friend,
If it makes you feel alright,
I’ll get you anything my friend,
If it makes you feel alright,
‘Cause I don’t care too much for money,
Money can’t buy me love.

I’ll give you all I’ve got to give,
If you say you love me too,
I may not have a lot to give,
But what I’ve got I’ll give to you,
I don’t care too much for money.
Money can’t buy me love.

Can’t buy me love, ev’rybody tells me so,
Can’t buy me love, no, no, no, no.

Say you don’t need no diamond rings,
And I’ll be satisfied,
Tell me that you want the kind of things,
That money just can’t buy,
I don’t care too much for money.
Money can’t buy me love.

Can’t buy me love, ev’rybody tells me so,
Can’t buy me love, no, no, no, no.

Say you don’t need no diamond rings,
And I’ll be satisfied,
Tell me that you want the kind of things,
That money just can’t buy,
I don’t care too much for money.
Money can’t buy me love.

Can’t buy me love, love,
Can’t buy me love.

1 Comment
  1. Matt Mortensen says

    In my opinion it’s thoughtfulness that people appreciate on Valentines Day. People want to feel loved and we often express that in our society through gifts. I try to always show my love through thoughtfulness. It’s harder to do because it take effort and planning, but the rewards are far greater. Also, I love the Beatles! Thank you for sharing this.

Comments are closed.


Notice: ob_end_flush(): failed to send buffer of zlib output compression (1) in /home/improve/public_html/wp-includes/functions.php on line 4669

Notice: ob_end_flush(): failed to send buffer of zlib output compression (1) in /home/improve/public_html/wp-includes/functions.php on line 4669